Contact

THE MAKING OF MARKOVA

By Tina Sutton

Published by Pegasus Books, release date August 2013

TINA SUTTON, Author

A writer, researcher, and journalist for over 35 years, Tina Sutton is currently a fashion, culture and feature writer for The Boston Globe. As a former color, style and consumer trend-forecaster for national corporations, she co-authored two widely read books geared to designers and graphic artists: Color Harmony Compendium: A Complete Color Reference for Designers of All Types (2009) and The Complete Color Harmony: Expert Color Information for Professional Color Results (2004), which has been re-printed in nine languages.

Ms. Sutton is an experienced public speaker and has appeared on television and radio shows across the country.

She also researches and writes material for museum and art catalogues, as well as the Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center at Boston University.

For writing projects or public speaking inquiries, contact Ms. Sutton at themakingofmarkova@gmail.com

PEGASUS BOOKS, New York, Publisher

Contact: Jessica Case, Senior Editor, Jessica@pegasusbooks.us, (212)-504-2924

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3 thoughts on “Contact”

  1. Carol Reese said:

    What a terrific web site. Thank you so much. Ms. Sutton has humanized Markova for me. In everything else I’ve read about her, she came across as a stuffed shirt. It’s wonderful to learn more about what a gracious and generous person she was.

  2. margarete gross said:

    This comment is for Tina Sutton:
    I love the book (unfortunately a library copy–which I keep renewing as I can’t stand the thought of not owning it!), and your web site is a tour de force. However, I have one or two comments:
    I did not understand the sentence on page 19 that reads “Lilian Alicia Marks made her stage debut at an age when Anna Pavlova was still dreaming of ballet lessons.” How could that be–Markova was dancing in the 1920s, Pavlova died in 1931.

    In addition, I was wondering about a certain photograph in the book that is captioned with the phrase “unknown photgrapher” (it is on the same page as a photo of a bust of Markova). Could the photographer have been Man Ray or possibly Lee Miller (he often took credit for some of her work). I have seen photographs of Miller in almost identical poses done by Man Ray.

    Thanks for an illuminating and enjoyable read…margarete gross

    • Dear Margarete,
      How nice of you to take the time to write, not to mention saying such lovely things. You made my day! In answer to your comments, when I wrote that “Lilian Alicia Marks made her stage debut at an age when Anna Pavlova was still dreaming of ballet lessons,” I meant that when they were both eight years old. At that age, Pavlova still hadn’t been accepted by the Maryinsky Ballet School.
      And the photo you mentioned – which is one of my favorites – had absolutely nothing printed on the back, not even the date – which is very unusual for top photography studios when providing client proofs. Man Ray did take Markova’s photo when she was at the Ballets Russes in the 1920s, but this one appears to be from the ’40s. I can definitely see the Lee Miller type pose quite clearly now that you’ve mentioned it. I assumed it was a Hollywood photographer, as it’s such a glamour shot compared to most of Markova’s photos. It was also one of several different dramatic portraits taken by the same unidentified photographer, all with cinematic lighting and with Markova wearing a range of elegant hats and fashions. I combed Markova’s archive for a possible duplicate with some identification, but never found any.

      Once again, I couldn’t be more pleased you’re enjoying the book and thank your for writing.

      Best Regards – Tina

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